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Nissan Signal Shield reduces smartphone distraction while driving

A car manufacturer, Nissan recently introduced a new technology aptly named Nissan Signal Shield. This device is aimed at improving on-road safety, it is basically just a box for your smartphone that blocks electromagnetic signals — including any cellular signals, Bluetooth, and Wi-Fi — So you stay focused on the road. The Nissan Signal Shield is currently only a concept stage and the company hasn’t yet announced that when this new technology arrive in cars. You can also review Nissan latest vehicles at autoxpedia.com.

The Nissan Signal Shield is a chamber within the armrest of a Nissan Juke that’s lined with a Faraday cage. Interestingly enough, it isn’t new technology. It was actually developed by scientist Michael Faraday as the Faraday cage back in 1830. Of course, at the time it was not developed to block cell phone signals, but rather other forms of electromagnetic fields.

Nissan signal shield
Nissan Signal Shield

With Nissan’s application of the technology, drivers can place their smartphones inside the bin to prevent themselves from receiving any cellular, Bluetooth or WiFi signals. This gives the driver the choice to opt out of the distractions caused by notifications from various mediums.

In case drivers want to listen to music stored in their phone, they can connect to the car’s entertainment system through the auxiliary or USB ports. The device can maintain wired connectivity even when it is inside the Nissan Signal Shield compartment.

Smartphone distraction is a very serious problem, of course, but there is a cause Nissan’s device is unlikely to progress any further than the current prototype stage. Because if people will not go to the trouble of actually using their smartphone’s ‘do no disturb’ mode, then they are just as unlikely to cut themselves off by way of armrest Faraday cage.

Nissan hasn’t yet revealed when this Signal Shield will make its way to production cars, but we do expect to see them in production variants soon.